Newsletters

Tax Impact Newsletter September-October 2018

  • Are LLC members subject to self-employment tax?
  • Ease new itemized deduction limitations using a nongrantor trust
  • Know your tax obligations before hiring household help
  • Tax Tips

Tax Impact Newsletter March-April 2018

  • The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act:  How will it affect your tax bill?
  • Breathe new life into a trust by “decanting” it
  • Identity theft and your tax returns: How to protect yourself
  • Tax Tips

Tax Impact Newsletter January-February 2018

  • Are bad business debts deductible?
  • Tax planning for investors: Income vs. growth
  • Higher education is expensive! Begin saving the tax-smart way with a Section 529 plan
  • Tax Tips

Highlights of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act 2017

The new tax reform law, commonly called the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (TCJA), is the biggest federal tax law overhaul in 31 years, and it has both good and bad news for taxpayers.  This  summary highlights some of the most significant changes affecting individual and business taxpayers. Except where noted, these changes are effective for tax years beginning after  December 31, 2017.

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

New IRS guidance fills in several more pieces of the Code Sec. 199A passthrough deduction puzzle. Taxpayers can generally rely on all of these new final and proposed rules.


The IRS has issued interim guidance on the excise tax payable by exempt organizations on remuneration in excess of $1 million and any excess parachute payments made to certain highly compensated current and former employees in the tax year. The excise tax imposed by Code Sec. 4960 is equal to the maximum corporate tax rate on income (currently 21 percent).


The IRS has provided safe harbors for business entities to deduct certain payments made to a charitable organization in exchange for a state or local tax (SALT) credit. A business entity may deduct the payments as an ordinary and necessary business expenses under Code Sec. 162 if made for a business purpose. Proposed regulations that limit the charitable contribution deduction do not affect the deduction as a business expense.


The Treasury and IRS have issued final regulations for determining the inclusion under Code Sec. 965 of a U.S. shareholder of a foreign corporation with post-1986 accumulated deferred foreign income. Code Sec. 965 imposes a "transition tax" on the inclusion. The final regulations retain the basic approach and structure of the proposed regulations, with certain changes.


The IRS has issued its annual revisions to the general procedures for ruling requests, technical memoranda, determination letters, and user fees, as well as areas on which the Associate Chief Counsel offices will not rule. The revised procedures are generally effective January 2, 2019.


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